Season 1, Episode 30: How Colombia Became An Important Player in the Fight Against Climate Change – Meg Symington, WWF

The Amazons are the largest rainforest in the world spanning 8 countries and comprising about 40% of all remaining rainforests in the entire world. New species are still being discovered at least once a week, and approximately 300 different indigenous groups call the Amazon their home.

Meg Symington, World Wildlife Foundation Managing Director for the Amazon project shares how they are working to keep a functional ecosystem that provides benefits to people and nature over the long term.

Born at the Conference of the Parties for the Climate Change Treaty in Paris in 2015, the Heritage Colombia Project is an ambitious PFP initiative for the next 20+ years to ensure the conversation of 20 million hectares (1 hectare = 100 acres) of natural areas by increasing the number of protected areas, improving management, and supporting productive activities in areas that connect these important protected regions.

Phase 1 is currently underway with a goal to have 14 million hectares of protected areas and corridors and five landscape mosaics in the Amazon. They are working to raise $100 million in donor funding which will be matched by the Government of Colombia.

The Heritage Colombia Project is establishing the framework to apply this model in other countries of the Amazon and beyond.

Links:

Heritage Colombia – https://www.worldwildlife.org/magazine/issues/winter-2017/articles/heritage-colombia

Meg Symington – https://www.worldwildlife.org/experts/meg-symington

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